Open the Pod Bay Doors HAL

7 thoughts on “Open the Pod Bay Doors HAL”

  1. Knowing how difficult it is to design secure systems and make security a non-negotiable feature, nothing scares me more than IoT.

  2. I believe we are organizing and packing for a long, long trip, boring, but long. Have a nice ride. This is beyond Max Weber, Jerry Mander and Orwell’s wildest nightmare.

  3. Dry tech has a huge potential to disrupt, but I wouldn’t underestimate the potential of Wet tech (bioengineering, especially of humans) either. In fact I think that Wet tech could end up being even more disruptive as people become more aware of it’s potential.

  4. I guess what bothers me is the continuation/amplification of the trend to infantilize us. we don’t need to have any skills (especially physical skills)…everything is done for us by machines. Even our thinking. And, the focus is especially on the convenience and pleasure for the top 10%/.

    The old Dead Kennedys album title comes to mind: Give Me Convenience or Give Me Death

  5. Great insights. IoT is an interesting trend. It’s become vastly cheaper and easier to the point where an inexperienced Web developer can program a microcontroller or microcomputer.

    That being said, it’s also overhyped. Unlike the Internet or the Web (2 separate developments), it’s not a once in a lifetime technology shift. It’s hard to predict but I think it’s a fair bet that behind the scenes industrial players will benefit the most while the public will just get surveilled even more.

    As for 3D printing and automation, I think those are again totally separate trends although of course they could be combined (an industrial 3d printer that uses sensors & machine learning to automate what used to be a human job)

  6. Player Piano. It has been happening since Vonnegut saw it at GE in the 50s.

    Each new wave of technology causes another skillset to become obsolete. Just in my working lifetime: NC and CNC machine tools helped to eliminate thousands of skilled machinist jobs; robotics eliminated lots of assembly and welding jobs; PCs with spreadsheet and word processing software did away secretarial work and the jobs of people who hand-built and typed reports and spreadsheets for middle managers; digital photography put Kodak and Fujifilm out of business; minicomputer-based CAD and plotter-printers put draftsmen and some engineers out of work. That’s just manufacturing. Similar advances have occurred in most fields of endeavor.

    And so it goes.

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